Diseases


Actinomycosis

Adenovirus Infection

Aids

Amebiasis

Anxiety

Ascariasis

Aspergillosis

Blastomycosis

Blepharitis

Botulism

Brain Abscess

Bronchiectasis

BOOP Infection

Brucellosis

Campylobacteriosis

Candidiasis

Cellulitis

Chancroid

Chlamydial

Cholera

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic Mucocutaneous Candidiasis

Clonorchiasis

Clostridium Difficile

Coccidioidmycosis

Colorado Tick Fever

Common Cold

Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis Inclusion

Creutzfeldt Jakob

Croup

Cryptococcus

Cryptosporidiosis

Cutaneous Larva Migrans

Cytomegalovirus

Dacryocystitis

Dermatophytosis

Dientamoeba Fragilis

Diphtheria

Ebola Virus

Ehrlichioses

Empyema

Encephalitis

Endocarditis

Enterobiasis

Enteroviral

Epididymis

Epiglottitis

Erysipelas

Erythema

Escherichia Coli And Other Enterobacteriaceae

Folliculitis

Gas Gangrene

Gastroenteritis

Genital Herpes

Genitourinary Infections

Giardiasis

Gingivitis

Glomerulonephritis

Gonorrhea

Granuloma Inguinale

Guillain Barre Syndrome

Helicobacter Pylori

Hepatitis

Dermatophytosis - Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Dermatophytosis Definition

Dermatophytosis is a superficial fungal infection of the skin, hair, or nails. It is caused by a dermatophyte and may be characterized by redness of the skin, small papular vesicles, fissures, and scaling. The infection is generally limited to the top layer of skin. Tinea pedis may be present with extreme itching and pain, especially while walking, because of the scaling and blisters between the toes.

The group of superficial fungal infections is usually classified according to location on the body. Dermatophytosis is also known as tinea, athlete's foot and ringworm.

Dermatophytosis Causes

Dermatophytosis or athlete's foot may be usually caused by a fungus called Trichophyton. It is a common condition that affects some people more than others. About twenty percent of all infected people develop chronic conditions. Dermatophytosis infections result from several different fungi. Transmission may be occured directly through contact with infected lesions or indirectly through contact with contaminated articles such as shoes, towels or shower stalls.

If the infection causes skin breakdown, a bacterial infection may be result. Some cases come from contact with animals or soil. Some of the fungi involved in these conditions primarily infect animals, but they may be transmitted from animals to humans.

Dermatophytosis Symptoms

Itching is the most common and annoying symptom of this condition. Athlete's foot usually appears as an itchy, red rash between the toes or underneath the arch of the foot. Some cats do not exhibit clinical symptoms but can be normal appearing carriers of the fungal organism.

Tinea barbae is an uncommon infection that affects the bearded facial area of men.

The other symptoms of the dermatophytosis:

  • dry skin
  • scaly skin
  • green nails
  • blisters
  • scabs
  • grey nails
  • ring-like raised itchy patches
  • temporary scalp hair loss at ringworm site

Dermatophytosis Treatments

Dermatophytosis or athlete's foot is easy to treat at home using an over-the-counter antifungal cream.

The creams may be contained:

  • tolnaftate
  • miconazole
  • other medicines

The healthcare provider may also be prescribed antifungal pills, some medications may be itraconazole, terbinafine,griseofulvin and fluconazole.

Topical antifungal preparations should be effective in treating small, uncomplicated tinea infections located in areas other than the scalp.

Tinea capitis, regardless of severity, may be treated with oral antifungal medication, since topical antifungals do not penetrate hair follicles well.

 

Herpes Simplex

Histoplasmosis

Impetigo

Infertility

Influenza

Keratitis

Laryngitis

Legionnaires

Leishmaniasis

Leprosy

Leptospirosis

Listeriosis

Low Blood Volume

Lung Abscess

Malaria

Mastitis and Breast Enlargement

Mastoiditis

Meningococcal Infection

Menstruation

Microsporidiosis

Mononucleosis

Mumps

Mycobacterium Avium Complex

Myelitis

Myringitis

Necrotizing Enterocolitis

Ornithosis

Osteomyelitis

Otitis Externa

Painful Menstruation

Parainfluenza

Pediculosis

Pericarditis

Peritonitis

Pertussis

Pheochromocytoma

Pilonidal Disease

Plague

Pleurisy

Pneumonia

Poliomyelitis

PML

Premenstrual Syndrome

Prostatitis

Puerperal Infection

Rectal Prolapse

Relapsing Fever

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

Roseola Infantum

Rotavirus

Rubella

Rubeola

Salmonellosis

Septic Shock

Sight Problems

Shingelosis

Sinusitis

Squamous cell Cancer

Stye

Throat Abscess

Thyroid Cancer

Tinea Versicolor

Tonsillitis

Tracheitis

Trachoma

Trichomoniasis

Trinchinosis

Urinary Tract Infection (Lower)

Uveitis

VRE Infection


HOME | CONTACT US | BLOG

Copyright © 2006 Health-Diseases.org. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: The services and information provided here are for information purposes. These information are not intended to act as a substitute for a professional healthcare practitioner advise. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, please consult your doctor.

Only personal contact with the qualified healthcare practitioner of your choice - who knows your health history, who can examine you, and who can bring expertise and experience to bear on your situation -- can yield advice about how you ought to handle any of the information you obtain from sources accessed through this service.