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Chancroid - Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Chancroid definition

Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection or sexually transmitted disease ( STI or STD) may be caused by the bacterium Haemophilus ducreyi, but it is curable. Chancroid is spread from one to another individual solely through sexual contact. A high rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been reported among patients with chancroid. This disease is common in sub-Saharan Africa among men who have frequent contact with prostitutes.

This disease is common in sub-Saharan Africa among men who have frequent contact with prostitutes. Chancroid is very common in Africa and parts of Asia. Although males are affected more often, female sex workers appear to be the reservoir of the disease. Chancroid is also known as soft chancrer, soft ulcer, venereal ulcer .

Chancroid Causes

Chancroid is a bacterial infection caused by the fastidious Gram-negative streptobacillus Hamophilus ducreyi. Chancroid is spread through direct contact with open sores that contain contagious H. ducreyi bacteria. After direct contact, the bacteria multiply, causing skin lesions and infection within lymph nodes. Chancroid causes ulcers, usually of the genitals. It is a disease commonly found in developing and third world countries. Poor hygiene may predispose males (especially those who are uncircumcised) to this disease.

Uncircumcised men are at three times greater risk than circumcised men for contracting chancroid from an infected partner. A few hundred cases a year are diagnosed in the United States.

Chancroid Symptoms

The main symptom is genital sores that rupture after a few days. After an incubation period of one day to two weeks, chancroid begins with a small bump that becomes an ulcer. It is soft to the touch. The term soft chancre is frequently used to describe the chancroid sore. Some people feel mildly ill.

The signs noticable by a doctor may be Genital ulcers , Painful open genital sores and Swollen groin lymph nodes.

The ulcer may be characteristically:

  • is painful
  • has sharply borders
  • has ragged borders
  • ranges in size dramatically
  • has a base that is covered with a grey
  • has a base that is yellowish-grey material
  • has a base that bleeds easily if traumatized or scraped

Chancroid Treatments

Chancroid may be treated effectively with several antibiotics. Effective antibiotics may be included azithromycin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, and erythromycin.

Some of the successful treatment of chancroid may be:

  • cures infection
  • resolves symptoms
  • Azithromycin
  • Ceftriaxone
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Erythromycin base

Partners should be examined and treated regardless of whether symptoms are present. The time required for complete healing is related to the size of the ulcer.

 

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